about sex, educating, learning, methods and tools, Uncategorized

Workshop Toolkit

Remember the‘Make It Normal’ workshop we had conducted for school students of class 8 and 11 separately, with the objective of starting a conversation about sex and sexuality?
The success of the workshop and the feedback we received from the students after it helped us make this toolkit. Post the workshop, we iterated the toolkit according to the feedback we received and devised a number of games for catalysing sex education in schools and other teaching scenarios. We put together the activities and and games we played in the workshop in a box, with an instruction booklet to guide the giver of information on the how to conduct the workshop and how to play the various games. The back of all the cards are left blank to customise each game according the socio-economic group the workshop would be conducted for. As the giver best knows the what works for her/his group of receivers!

toolkit

The workshop booklet can be viewed here
Booklet

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about sex, censorship, design thinking, Make it normal, post cards, solutions, Uncategorized

Uncensored: For Make it Normal

Around the world, the utmost concern of censors is the depiction of violence and sex. So we came up with a set of postcards as a part of our campaign ‘Make It Normal’ questioning India’s policy of censorship –  a constant dichotomy that we live in. While there is no dearth of ‘item songs’ objectifying women in popular media, various scenes in a film are not allowed past the filters due to “questionable content”. While age appropriate censoring should be prevalent, an adult should have full freedom to choose between  what she/he wishes to watch. There must be uniformity in the exercise of deciding what is aired and what is bleeped. Artists should be allowed to express themselves in the manner they believe will do justice to their work.

These postcards with reference to popular forms of art make consumers question their values and governmental policies that filter content, and in turn result in individuals having skewed notions about sexuality.

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about sex, Design mapping, infographic, sex, Sex education, Uncategorized

Giga Map

To paint a clearer picture of the situation of sex and sexuality education in India and the world today, we decided to use the metaphor of lamp posts on the riverside.

Considering the fact that sex, sexuality and all related terms have been shoved into the darkest corners of our rooms and away from our children, whether at home or at school, we want these lamp posts to stress on our belief that light needs to be shed onto these corners, conversations regarding these topics and issues need to be started by us all.

And only when we turn the lights on will we see how good or bad sexuality education can potentially affect us, and this is where the riverside comes in. The actions of the facilitators and givers of sex ed will clearly reflect on the actions of the receivers of sex ed, and any inept guidance will in turn make inept givers and facilitators out of them.
And similarly, our process of ideation using our GMTN cards at the bottom is a reflection of sexuality education’s current scenario at the top. After looking at the sex ed policies and relevant data of various countries, we came to the conclusion that spreading awareness among the receivers should be our primary objective, and using our ideation process we reached eight different approaches that can make that happen.

giga map finished vertical

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about sex, complex problems, sex, Sex education, technology

A single click

Baby poster-01Young individuals of today spend more time interacting with multiple forms of media, including the Internet compared other activities. 95% of today’s youth is online, and 74% of them are able to access the Internet from a personal mobile device. Clicking on screens and speaking into our mobiles and tablets readily retrieve information. It’s fast, it’s easy. Information has become ubiquitous in today’s technology-saturated world. But how much of that information is trustworthy? Combine that with the fact of kids being naturally curious about sex and wanting to find out as much as possible and discuss with their peers, and we have a big problem to deal with here. Modern sexuality education and the values imposed by our culture have continuously refrained from accepting the existence of all the exposure children are receiving today.
When a child comes across extremely graphic images or videos online, it can be both stimulating and upsetting. An unexpected encounter with highly provocative sexual material crosses boundaries and compromises innocence. As stimulating as it can be for kids to see graphic sexual material, it can also be overwhelming and even frightening. The association may often be direct, between one’s exposure to sexually explicit material and one’s sexual attitude and behavior.

So,

Either we allow sexually explicit material online to be the sex educator of the youth today, or we take the responsibility on ourselves. For the latter to happen, we must clearly outline the existence and meaning of pornography and sexually explicit material, differentiate between porn sex and real sex, examine the frameworks of sexuality and its ethics, and exchange views on the idea of right and wrong in the context of sexual activity.

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about sex, Make it normal, responses, sex, Sex education

Make it Normal – Youngsters Talk Sex

We invited a few of our peers and asked them to read out some general facts about sex. None of them knew what they were going to be reading. We captured their reactions on camera.

But apart from all the awkwardness and the laughter involved, there are other reasons behind the making of this video. Their reactions show that talking out loud about these topics is not the most comfortable thing to do, even though they were speaking these words before their own friends, even though these statements are facts, adults of their age should know (that is if they knew what all they were saying).

And beyond the kind people who spared time to participate, some of the ones watching this for the first time might just hear something they haven’t heard before, in a ‘more fun than biology class’ way.

But the bottom line is, why should it be so embarrassing?

 

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about sex, educating, learning, Sex education, workshop

Make It Normal – the Structure

We devised a workshop called ‘Make It Normal’ for school students of class 8 and 11 separately, with the objective of starting a conversation about sex and sexuality.

Make it Normal

The workshop’s structure

Before holding any workshops we consulted Ms. jamila Firdaus, the school counsellor at Navrachana High School, Vadodara. She helped us segregate our content age-appropriately and told us how to approach the students.

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Discussions with Jamila Ma’am

The workshop would begin with an ice-breaking video just to have a laugh and make the students feel comfortable. The ice-breaking videos for class 8 and 11 respectively are as follows –

The video would be followed by games – ‘Describe It’ and ‘Myth & Match’. Both games involve interactions between students that prompt exchanges of information between them regarding topics related to sex and sexuality, interspersed with us stepping in to provide them with extra information.

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Tools used for our games ‘Describe It’ (the pink slips), ‘Myth & Match’ (the green cards), and the red question box for anonymous queries.

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Cards segregated into separate stacks for the two classes

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A class 8 student describing a word to the class

After playing the games, students would ask us questions anonymously using a question box, which would be discussed and answered by us in front of the whole class.

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Anonymous Q & A with class 8

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The feedback form to be filled by each student at the end the workshop

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